Authorship Rich Snippet Now Working After 3 Months
Mar25

Authorship Rich Snippet Now Working After 3 Months

12SHARESFacebookTwitter During the end of 2013, Google reduced the number of authorship rich snippets by 15%. Matt Cutts, Google’s head of webspam, announced that they would reduce the number of sites that would receive the authorship rich snippet based on the quality of the website the “rel=author” markup is being used on. On December 31st, 2013 I setup authorship on this website and for some reason I could only see the text snippet and the photo of myself seemed to be non-existent. I questioned whether my website was good enough, so I experimented by accepting a fairly reputable guest blogger in the field of SEO to blog on Vlexo.NET and implemented the correct markup, which resulted in their image eventually showing up in the SERPs: Whilst this was going on, I was still having issues with my authorship rich snippet image from showing up. But the above screenshot proves that it has NOTHING to do with my website, but perhaps other factors. I looked into the following potential issues: Perhaps I had implemented the “rel=author” markup incorrectly My profile picture was not within the correct guidelines (this appears to be quite a common issue) I rechecked everything to no avail, and nothing happened — so I sort of gave up at this stage. Obviously, there was something that Google didn’t like or perhaps I just needed to wait it out. And so I did! You can see what I mean when the G+ profile picture never showed up: Fast forward to today and this is currently what one of my articles look like on the search engine results page when searching for “Best SEO tools”: As you can see by the fancy arrow that I’ve added to the image above, my Google+ profile picture is now visible in the search engine results pages as a thumbnail. This should potentially increase my click-through rates (CTR) and I’m monitoring see if this has an impact on traffic. However, it’s not all good news as Google seem to have excluded a few articles that I had wrote from receiving my beautiful face from appearing in the search engine results pages. For example, Google has excluded my Google+ image from the following article in the search engine results page. I have found however that they have only included the authorship rich snippet on articles going forward from a certain date. I can’t see why they would do this, but it’s no big deal as they’ve placed the authorship rich snippets on most of the articles that I would like them to be on. Hopefully going forward I’ll still receive such snippets on future articles. It...

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Google Takes Action Against MyBlogGuest
Mar19

Google Takes Action Against MyBlogGuest

9SHARESFacebookTwitter Today Matt Cutts announced via Twitter that Google had taken action against a “large guest blog network”. Many have suspected that this mysterious guest blog network is MyBlogGuest.com. This suspicion stems from the fact that the MBG website is no longer viewable in Google’s index when you type in any of the keywords associated with their website. What is MyBlogGuest.com? It’s advertised as a community where website owners and those looking to guest blog on other blogs can go to engage in such activities. I’ve used the website on the odd occasion, but I honestly cannot see what they were doing wrong. Ann Smarty, the founder and owner of MyBlogGuest.com, is actually an SEO that I respect quite a bit. She actually says and does quite a lot in regards to respecting Google’s guidelines. However, my opinion of her is unchanged and if anything my respect for her has gone up. Why? The day after Matt Cutts wrote a post about the “decay and fall of guest blogging for SEO” she wrote a response to this and said the following in regards to MyBlogGuest: “MyBlogGuest is NOT going to allow nofollow links or paid guest blogging (even though Matt Cutts seems to be forcing us to for whatever reason).” It likely wasn’t a good move on Ann Smarty’s part to say that they would essentially not abide by what Matt Cutts (the head of spam at Google) was suggesting that blog owners do in his latest blog post edition that focused on guest blogging. I think that has really highlighted MBG and they are perhaps suffering from that. I’m actually not sure if Matt Cutts was actually referring to MyBlogGuest.com, as they are against using guest blogging as a means for SEO purposes. Undoubtedly, SEOs would have used this website for other reasons, but I don’t think that is the main premise behind MyBlogGuest.com and they actively police against this. Let’s take a step back for a minute and actually look at MyBlogGuest.com. Firstly, they do not allow paid guest posts. They are quite explicit on this and will only accept content based on quality. No payment involved in that at all. In that quote that I referenced above, it seems that Ann Smarty seems to think that Matt Cutts is now forcing content writers to add a nofollow attribute if they link back to their own website in any given guest post they manage to publish on other websites. In my opinion, this is ludicrous if this was the reason why they’ve been penalised. (Read the quote below to see why) Secondly, if I submit an article...

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Exciting New Release By BrightEdge: Data Cube
Mar16

Exciting New Release By BrightEdge: Data Cube

12SHARESFacebookTwitter The new security enhancement feature that BrightEdge today announced is not as exciting as the new “Data Cube” feature that allows BrightEdge customers to leverage over 100 terabytes of data that BrightEdge processes each week. It’s actually a feature very similar in another platform called SEMRUSH, which I have recently been trialing as I’ve been given a three month trial. Before this, BrightEdge would only give you keyword-level data on competitors you would have to submit to them and this makes the “SEO Performance” tab quite useful, but I see this new feature being even more useful. Now you can enter any website you want via the “Data Cube” tab – similar to how search engines work or a better version of Google’s Keyword Planner. However, it’s far more extensive with options such as “Discover Long Tail Keywords” and “Explore Content Strategies” being two features within this feature being the eye candy. BrightEdge has had access to this sort of data for over 6 years and in a .pdf they recently released to customers  stated that “we are giving you direct access!” I’m quite frankly surprised that this feature wasn’t already available as it is something that other platforms such as SEMRUSH have been refining for several years. Either way, I feel that it is a great feature that I welcome and I’ll likely be using. BrightEdge are marketing this as a feature that provides “on-demand research capabilities” and they certainly have the data to back this up. Here’s a small screenshot of the tool in action (via BrightEdge): I really like the fact that you can enter a domain or keyword. For example, if I wanted to leverage BrightEdge for my military website I would simply have to enter “military vehicles” and should hopefully find a full list of keywords that I could then target. Then if I had my military website plugged into BrightEdge I could track these keywords and start creating content around the newly tracked keywords or I could start creating content utilising the “Discover Long Tail Keywords” tab to find the long tail keywords that I should be ranking for. The idea is to identify the keywords that I want to rank for, track them, and then create content around them. And because these keywords are being tracked I can then identify if whatever SEO work I do on my military website, for example, is working or not working. Best feature yet The fact they are now giving us access to this data is going to make the Google Keyword Planner somewhat irrelevant. With this new tool you’ll be able to find keywords that...

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Matt Cutts didn’t expect this response via Twitter (Scraper URL)
Feb28

Matt Cutts didn’t expect this response via Twitter (Scraper URL)

19SHARESFacebookTwitter Google’s head of search spam, Matt Cutts, recently tweeted a link to a form that allows website owners to report websites that have scraped content from other sites and that rank higher than those of the original source. Cutts is referring to website owners that scrape content from other websites and post that content on their own websites. This sort of means that Google might not be able to tell, in some cases, what site is the original source. Probably not what Cutts expected .@mattcutts I think I have spotted one, Matt. Note the similarities in the content text: pic.twitter.com/uHux3rK57f — dan barker (@danbarker) February 27, 2014 To put it simply, someone has spotted that Google does exactly what a scraper does. It scrapes content from sites like Wikipedia, and uses it for its semantic search functions by providing the information in the SERPs, which means everyone should report Google for exactly what it is telling others to report. Whilst Google only extracts an excerpt of information from articles via Wikipedia, the irony is actually quite...

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Find Out Who Shared Your URL on Facebook
Feb09

Find Out Who Shared Your URL on Facebook

20SHARESFacebookTwitter Finding out who linked to you on social media I noticed that when I published an article yesterday, I had a few referrals come through from Facebook. But when I clicked to find out exactly where on Facebook my post was shared I couldn’t actually find the exact location of the referral page on Facebook. I came to conclusion that I’d need some sort of tool as Google Analytics wasn’t showing me exactly where the referral came from and nor was WordPress’ Jetpack. I searched and searched with long-tail inputs such as “find out who linked to you on facebook” and came up with results from 2011 that really weren’t relevant today. Suggestions included using Facebook’s internal search system, which no longer works how it once did. Social Mentions – A social listening tool I then somehow came across a website called “Social Mentions“, and it provided me with the ability to find exactly who was sharing my post and where. The tool itself works like a search engine and you simply have to type in the keywords or in my case I typed parts of the title of the page that was being shared on Facebook. Again, that was the post from yesterday about Halifax being partially penalised. You can see the results here: It picked up exactly where these shares were coming from, and from this I could identify who was sharing and why. For example, yesterday’s post was shared by someone because I had commended their detective work on Halifax.co.uk penalty, which happened to be a case study on Link Research Tools. Perhaps, I should commend a lot more often! What I found A little surprise. That’s pretty neat. I’ll be using this tool for a lot more as it such a useful...

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