Find Out Who Shared Your URL on Facebook
Feb09

Find Out Who Shared Your URL on Facebook

20SHARESFacebookTwitter Finding out who linked to you on social media I noticed that when I published an article yesterday, I had a few referrals come through from Facebook. But when I clicked to find out exactly where on Facebook my post was shared I couldn’t actually find the exact location of the referral page on Facebook. I came to conclusion that I’d need some sort of tool as Google Analytics wasn’t showing me exactly where the referral came from and nor was WordPress’ Jetpack. I searched and searched with long-tail inputs such as “find out who linked to you on facebook” and came up with results from 2011 that really weren’t relevant today. Suggestions included using Facebook’s internal search system, which no longer works how it once did. Social Mentions – A social listening tool I then somehow came across a website called “Social Mentions“, and it provided me with the ability to find exactly who was sharing my post and where. The tool itself works like a search engine and you simply have to type in the keywords or in my case I typed parts of the title of the page that was being shared on Facebook. Again, that was the post from yesterday about Halifax being partially penalised. You can see the results here: It picked up exactly where these shares were coming from, and from this I could identify who was sharing and why. For example, yesterday’s post was shared by someone because I had commended their detective work on Halifax.co.uk penalty, which happened to be a case study on Link Research Tools. Perhaps, I should commend a lot more often! What I found A little surprise. That’s pretty neat. I’ll be using this tool for a lot more as it such a useful...

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Useful SEO Tools & January SEO Recap
Feb01

Useful SEO Tools & January SEO Recap

10SHARESFacebookTwitter I’ll be introducing a weekly update to this blog from now on. Essentially what I’ll be writing about is what I’ve done in the week that is noteworthy. Simply, anything noteworthy will be listed here and hopefully it will be useful to those reading. If anything, it might only be useful for myself — in that case, my apologies. Tools To start off with I was recently introduced to a new SEO tool called Netpeak. The tool practically runs on APIs and it’s another of those tools that I’ve listed in the “Best SEO Tools for 2014” article. The tool is quite versatile and allows you to check hundreds if not thousands of URLs’ metrics. The metrics that it includes are: Domain Authority; Page Authority; PageRank; Citation Flow; Trust Flow; Ahrefs backlinks; MozScape (OSE) backlinks; MajesticSEO backlinks; Domain Age; Google Index; Social metrics: StumbleUpon, Facebook Likes/Shares, Twitter, Google+ and more. This is very useful for a number of reasons. If you’re doing outreach and you want to get your content on a high quality site then there is no better way to identify a decent website (aside from reading said site’s content) by analysing it with Netpeak. I’ve not only used this for outreach, but for analysing clients’ websites; it’s just another way of identifying backlinks where you did not know you had them at all. I actually recommend using Screaming Frog to scrape your website and then run all your URLs within this tool. It really gives you a nice overview of how your site is doing, especially within the social media aspect of things. Netpeak essentially takes all the manual work out of it all and is a nice package. I really do recommend it. A big thanks to James Phillips, a new co-worker, who recommended it. Methods Two of my clients at the agency I work at recently moved to new CMSs (It’s sort of the reason why I wrote that article on checking the backlink profile of 5,000 URLs), and this of course meant that the URL structure changed. Setting up 301 redirects is obviously one of the most important things to do when a change like this occurs; otherwise, you lose any value that you had in the search results page to a 404 page if there is no redirect in place. What I did actually identified issues that my client were not aware of. We had redirects going to totally irrelevant pages, and simply pages that had been deleted without any redirect taking place. How do you find these? Our relationship with our client is moreover one where we do a lot...

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How to Quickly Check the Backlink Profile of Over 5,000 URLs
Jan25

How to Quickly Check the Backlink Profile of Over 5,000 URLs

18SHARESFacebookTwitter Migrating to new Content Management Systems (CMS’s) can be difficult at times, especially if the site that is being migrated has thousands of duplicated URLs that have high quality backlinks associated with them. If it’s your job then you better come up with a solution and hopefully this article will provide a few. I was recently tasked to analyse or come up with a way to segment these 5,000 URLs to make it more manageable. I’ll admit I don’t have much experience when it comes to migrating very large websites, so it took me a couple hours to come up with an idea as to how we could go forward. Rather than sit like a lemon all day long and ignore all of these soft 404s that were popping up left, right and centre in Google Webmaster Tools I came up with a few ideas and utilised a few industry tools to help. The first idea that I came up with was using Regular Expressions in Excel to categorise each URL based on the keywords that are in the actual URL. I then realised that I was doing this the wrong way round. The idea behind this was to categorise these URLs and to write a rule to say that if a URL contains a certain keyword then it should redirect to the most appropriate page that likely contains the same keyword. The problem with this is that it isn’t accurate and you could possibly be redirecting URLs to a page that isn’t actually that relevant. So what should I do instead? Seeing as this client is quite large, it’s worth going through to see what the backlink profile is for each individual URL that we grabbed from Webmaster Tools (over 5,000). And that’s easier said than done if you don’t have the right tools. Luckily for me, the agency I work at has all the tools that you’d ever want for this to work. ScrapeBox or MajesticSEO At first I tried using ScrapeBox on a VPS that we have to scour the backlink profile for all of those 5,000 URLs using the Mozscape API. I left this running over night, but when I got home I looked for other solutions as I knew that Moz’s Index isn’t that large and I might not get all the backlink data as a result. I found out that MajesticSEO has a tool called the “Bulk Backlink Checker“. At this point I celebrated as I’ve found that MajesticSEO is arguably one of the best backlink checking tools in the SEO industry. I simply pasted all 5,000 URLs into a .txt file and...

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Title & Meta Optimisation using Screaming Frog
Dec21

Title & Meta Optimisation using Screaming Frog

12SHARESFacebookTwitter It’s important to optimise your meta descriptions and titles so that they stand out in the search engine results pages (SERPS) and if you’ve got a particularly large website then the process can be quite daunting. However, with the help of programs like Screaming Frog, you should be able to speed this process up a little. And, I really do mean a little, as you’ll still be spending most of your time writing page titles & meta descriptions. Here, I’ll show you how I’m going to optimise my titles and meta descriptions for Vlexo.Net. I’ve been meaning to do this for a couple months now, but I’ve just not had the time to do this. I guess I don’t have that excuse anymore, as I’m on annual leave. 🙂 What is Screaming Frog? Screaming Frog is a crawler and it’s something you should be aware of if you have ever delved in the world of SEO. It’s an awesome tool, in my opinion, which helps you to identify areas of your website/blog that need improvement. For example, you can see where on your site you’re missing H1 & H2 tags or if there are duplicate H1 & H2 tags – with a number to go alongside it. It’s essentially a tool that analyses your website from an SEO perspective. I won’t go into too much description on this, as you can find out what the tool does on the Screaming Frog website. Play around with it and get used to it. In fact, don’t even read about what it does, just run the program and see what you can find out after you enter your site in the URL field. How do you go about optimising your site’s titles and meta descriptions? It’s simple. Using Screaming Frog I simply typed in my domain in the URL field and hit “Start”. What this does is crawl your entire site — pages, images, css, javascript and probably more — then you can use this information accordingly by exporting this data into an Excel spreadsheet and adding into a table to filter it. This is what it should look like in Screaming Frog: The time consuming task is actually coming up with high quality meta descriptions and titles. It’s probably worth doing keyword research behind the pages you’re trying to optimise. For now, you can optimise each page for keywords that you think people will be searching for to find your lovely website, which is essentially what I’m going to be doing with this site. Hit the export button and download the file. Open it up in Microsoft Excel:   It’s a little disjointed,...

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